As Faith Films Rise, The Christopher Awards Honor Uplifting Movies, TV and Books

“The Star”: Courtesy AFFIRM Films/Sony Pictures Animation

Just in the last month, the faith-based drama “I Can Only Imagine,” which cost $7M to produce, has earned over $58M at the box office. This past Easter Sunday, NBC’s “Jesus Christ Superstar Live” earned both good reviews and won primetime for the night.

To put it mildly, Hollywood is a bit surprised. From Entertainment Weekly:

“There is this mainstream bubble that is marginalizing these types of films, and we do underestimate them,” explains comScore’s senior media analyst (and box office expert) Paul Dergarabedian, adding that the Easter holiday could inspire countless droves of parishioners to plop down cash at the multiplex at the request of their religious leaders. “The faith-based films may be bolstered by perhaps the most grassroots of all movie marketing, which is at the church level. It’s like having a watercooler discussion at work, but you’re having a watercooler discussion in front of a church. You can imagine that, on Easter Sunday, when the leader of the flock is up there [giving a] sermon, it might be about going to see [a movie like the upcoming Jim Caviezel film] Paul, Apostle of Christ.”

“It’s a mistake to underestimate faith-based movies,” Dergarabedian concludes. “Just because you’re not seeing it in your own backyard, it doesn’t mean it’s not happening.”

But if one looks, Christian values can be found in many places, including both faith-based projects and secular ones. The purpose of the annual Christopher Awards is to recognize these efforts.

First presented in 1949, the Christopher Awards were established by Christopher founder Father James Keller to salute media that “affirm the highest values of the human spirit.” Their goal is to encourage men, women and children to pursue excellence in creative arenas that have the potential to influence a mass audience positively. Award winners encourage audiences to see the better side of human nature and motivate artists and the general public to use their best instincts on behalf of others.

All the 2018 awards can be found here.

From The Christophers ‘ Director of Communications Tony Rossi, the producer and writer of the annual awards:

In a world where there’s a lot of anger and division, people need stories like those we’re honoring with Christopher Awards this year. From heroism in war to ordinary acts of kindness, these stories can serve as instruments of grace, helping us to see beyond our differences and celebrate our common humanity.

Here are the TV and film winners …

Broadcast TV & Cable:

ABC News 20/20:Wonder Boy follows the Newman family as they deal with their son Nathaniel’s rare cranio-facial condition called Treacher Collins, the brutal surgeries he must endure as a result, and their efforts to help the world see his beautiful heart, mind, and soul.

The mini-series The Long Road Home (National Geographic Channel) dramatizes the 2004 ambush of the U.S. Army’s First Cavalry Division as they started peacekeeping duties in Sadr City, Iraq, the anxieties of their families back home, and the sacrifice and heroism of ordinary soldiers.

In The Christmas Miracle, an episode of the long-running comedy series The Middle (ABC), Frankie Heck’s [played by Catholic star Patricia Heaton] adult son Axl refuses to attend church with the family on Christmas Eve, causing her to confront her own lackluster spirituality and recognize the importance of connecting with God.

The Music of Strangers (HBO) celebrates the unique sounds and individuals that make up cellist Yo-Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble, a group of musicians from the U.S., Europe, Asia, and Africa, who blend their musical cultures in order to build bridges in a divided world.

POV: Swim Team (PBS) highlights Michael and Maria Quay’s efforts to give their son and other young people with autism the opportunity to achieve goals and gain confidence by channeling their energies into sports in an inclusive and encouraging environment.

Feature films:

With a Nazi invasion of England imminent, newly appointed Prime Minister Winston Churchill [Academy Award-winner Gary Oldman] must rally his unprepared nation and fellow members of Parliament to fight for liberty and freedom in Darkest Hour (Focus Features).

A rebellious and insecure teen, who has a contentious relationship with her mother, strives for independence and experiences moments of grace due to the subtle, unrealized influences of her Catholic education in Lady Bird (A24 Films).

A brave donkey, lovable sheep, and wisecracking dove make up the merry band of misfits on a divine mission to bring Mary and Joseph to Bethlehem for Jesus’ birth in the animated Nativity story The Star (AFFIRM Films/Sony Pictures Animation).

Asked by FTP for a comment, “The Star’s” Catholic director, Timothy Reckart, said: “All of us on the team are very grateful to Sony Pictures Animation for giving us the opportunity to retell the Nativity story in a playful, original way, and we are thrilled that the Christopher Awards has honored our efforts.”

Last but not least:

Based on the Christopher Award-winning bestseller, Wonder (Lionsgate) tells the story of a 10-year-old boy, born with facial deformities, who enters a mainstream school for the first time and teaches his classmates and community about compassion, acceptance, and the power of kindness.

The 69th annual Christopher Awards will be handed out in New York City on May 17.

Image: Courtesy AFFIRM Films/Sony Pictures Animation

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