Category: Books

Christopher Awards: ‘Hacksaw Ridge,’ ‘This Is Us,’ Dolly Parton and More …

Hacksaw-Ridge-This-Is-Us-ChristophersHollywood can often seem hostile to family values, but The Christopher Awards intend to honor good where it can be found, whether in movies, television or books.

The Christopher Awards were created in 1949 to celebrate writers, producers, directors, authors and illustrators whose work “affirms the highest values of the human spirit.”

Today, March 28, The Christophers — founded by Maryknoll priest Father James Keller in 1945 — released the 68th Annual Christopher Award winners, to be presented in New York City on May 16.

Said director of communications Tony Rossi:

“The powerful love of family is a thread in so many of our winning projects this year, be it family we’re related to by blood or those whose kindness and selflessness lead us to form an emotional and spiritual connection with them. These are the kinds of bonds that can change people’s lives and change the world.”

The movie winners are “Hacksaw Ridge,” “Hidden Figures,” “The Hollars” and “Queen of Katwe” (or own Father David Guffey reviewed that one). Said “Hidden Figures” director Ted Melfi (a previous winner for “St. Vincent” in 2014):

“Movies that entertain are the norm, but films that enlighten, educate and inspire are so rare, yet so important and the Christopher Award shines light on these films, further illuminating their footprint on the planet. As one candle has the ability to cast out darkness, such is the power of one film to impact hearts and minds for the better. It’s truly an honor to be considered for a Christopher Award…and an incredible blessing to be awarded one.”

The TV offerings blend TV-movies, scripted series and documentary. They are “60 Minutes: Gold Star Parents,” “America ReFramed: In the Game,” “Born This Way: Bachelor Pad,” “Dolly Parton’s Christmas of Many Colors: Circle of Love,” “Marathon: The Patriots Day Bombing” and hit freshman drama “This Is Us” (I had my say on that one).

Click here to read the whole release, including the rundown of worthy books for adults and young people.

Image: Courtesy NBC/Lionsgate

Learn more about Family Theater Productions’ upcoming, new and vintage productions as well as our Hollywood Outreach Programs; and, of course, you’ll find us on Facebook. Visit our YouTube and Ustream Channels for our contemporary and classic productions.

‘The Shack': FTP’s Father David Guffey Talks About the Controversial New Movie

The-Shack-Sam-Worthington-Octavia-SpencerComing out this weekend, “The Shack,” based on best-selling book by William Paul Young, explores what happens when a grieving father (Sam Worthington) has an encounter with all three Persons of the Trinity, played by different actors — including “Hidden Figures” star Octavia Spencer as God the Father, or “Papa.”

Personifying the Trinity, and other aspects of the book’s theology, have caused some concerns.

Secular outlet The Hollywood Reporter had this to say:

With its sparkly spin on the New Testament, the film will be too New Agey for those who hew closely to doctrine (some conservative Christians have criticized the novel as a work of misguided heresy). But beyond theological debates, the feature is a leaden, belabored affair. However universal the perennial questions and struggles that The Shack illuminates, under Stuart Hazeldine’s plodding direction, its faith-based brand of self-help feels like being trapped in someone else’s spiritual retreat — in real time.

And this, from Catholic deacon and movie critic Steven Greydanus:

Like many popular sensations, from Titanic to Twilight, from Dan Brown to Lee Child’s Jack Reacher novels, The Shack is easy to rip apart if one has a mind to. It’s too didactic for drama, too literal for allegory, too artless for poetry, and too fuzzy for theology. The writing is folksy and florid; when Mack falls in his driveway, he doesn’t just get a bump on his head: The lump emerges “like a humpbacked whale breaching the wild waves of his thinning hair.”

Although an enthusiastic cover blurb from Eugene Peterson compares The Shack to Pilgrim’s Progress, generically and thematically it’s somewhat closer to C.S. Lewis’ The Great Divorce. Lewis’ brilliant book, however, focuses on familiar foibles of human nature; Young attempts a portrait of sorts of the divine nature.

The Shack is essentially an imaginative exploration of theodicy, of the problem of evil, experienced not in the abstract, but as an existential crisis of faith. More broadly, it could be called a response to disappointment with God and disillusionment with religion.

David GuffeyAlso concerned, CatholicMom.com founder Lisa Hendey turned to our own Head of Production, Father David Guffey, C.S.C., to get his take. Here’s some of what he had to say:

The film is not a religious teaching on the doctrine of Trinity, any more than the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel is a study of physical appearance of God. Each of these use artistic license to point to great truths of faith. Film is an art form and as art, evokes the imagination to discover mystery of life and the workings of God’s grace within it. I would not use this film to talk about Trinity, but instead as an opening to discuss the many ways that God is close to us and the ways that God actively tries to be part of our lives in the best of times and especially in the hardest of times.

I would encourage you to see this film with someone you can talk about it with afterwards. You will want to. It would be a great family movie night film the weekend of March 3, 2017.

After watching the film, invite family members to talk about the times in their life when they feel closest to God. Is it in nature or in a church or at a family gathering? How do we recognize the hand of God at work I the people around us and the events of our lives? Second, and perhaps more difficult, I would encourage a conversation on how the Phillips family coped with loss and grief.

Click here to read the whole thing.

Image: Courtesy Lionsgate

Learn more about Family Theater Productions’ upcoming, new and vintage productions as well as our Hollywood Outreach Programs; and, of course, you’ll find us on Facebook.

Advent Entertainment Calendar for You and Your Family — Week Two

muppet-christmas-carol-ffbThe second Sunday of Advent, Dec. 4, is upon us, as Catholics and other Christians prepare to celebrate the Nativity.

In addition to such traditional customs as the Advent Wreath and keeping an Advent Calendar, we’re adding in a viewing calendar of online and TV offerings to enjoy as a family over the holidays.

Take a look below at seven more days of festive fun …

December 4, Second Sunday of Advent:

“Rudolph and Frosty’s Christmas in July” 10:05 a.m. ET/PT on Freeform and via the Freeform App – The ultimate Christmas crossover special featuring Rudolph and Frosty in stop-motion animation.

“Saving Santa” on Netflix – A lowly stable elf finds that he is the only one who can stop an invasion of the North Pole by using the secret of Santa’s Sleigh, a TimeGlobe, to travel back in time to Save Santa – twice.

“The Muppet Christmas Carol” on HBO Go and HBO Now, or on DVD from Netflix – The Muppets tell their version of the classic Dickens tale about a miser whose life is changed, all in one Christmas Eve.

December 6, Second Tuesday of Advent:

“A Fairly Odd Christmas” on Hulu – Timmy Turner’s been going overboard with his wish granting, and now that Christmas is just around the corner, there’s almost nothing left for Santa to do! Can he save Christmas and get off the naughty list too?

December 8, Second Thursday of Advent:

“Toy Story That Time Forgot” 8 p.m. ET/PT on ABC (or below!) – It’s a post-Christmas play date, and the toys have to go up against the fearsome and aggressive new dino toys.

“Shrek the Halls” 8:30 p.m. ET/PT on ABC – This half-hour animated TV special features the Shrek characters putting their own spin on holiday traditions.

December 9, Second Friday of Advent:

“Albert” 7 p.m. ET/PT on Nickelodeon and available on Nick.com and the Nick AppThe network’s first original animated movie. based on the Big Golden Book about a tiny Douglas fir tree that goes on a journey to become the city’s most famous Christmas tree ever.

albert-nick

 

December 10, Second Saturday of Advent:

“Doc McStuffins: A Very McStuffins Christmas” on HuluDoc and her pals travel to Santa’s workshop in the North Pole.

Click here for part one and here for part three.

Images: Courtesy Walt Disney Productions/Jim Henson Productions; Big Golden Book

Visit the Family Theater Productions homepage and Facebook page to learn more about how FTP is reaching out to Hollywood and producing its own projects.

L.A.’s Bishop Barron Cheers for C.S. Lewis’ ‘The Great Divorce’

CS-Lewis-Great-DivorceSince I started working at Family Theater Productions, I acquired a daily commute, so I resonate with Los Angeles Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron’s reliance on the company of audiobooks while navigating the L.A. area’s interminable traffic.

I’ve been working my way through some purchases from Franciscan Media during the recent Los Angeles Religious Education Congress, while Bishop Barron — formerly Father Barron of Chicago, the founder of media apostolate Word on Fire — has been matriculating through C.S. Lewis’ religious fantasy work, “The Great Divorce.”

Today, he wrote an essay about why he recommends it.

It follows several ghosts that get a respite from Hell and take a bus trip to Heaven, where, apparently, they have an option to stay. Surprisingly, many don’t take it.

A 2014 essay in Crisis Magazine on “The Great Divorce” explains:

The majority of the characters in Lewis’s novel—given the choice after they visit the Bright World and learn of its conditions—prefer the Grey City to the Bright World for a variety of motives but ultimately for one main reason. A heretical bishop rejects the invitation because “I have to be back next Friday to read a paper. We have a little theological society down there.” To the cynic called “the hard-bitten ghost” the Bright World offers the same old thing: “A human being couldn’t live here. All that idea of staying is only an advertisement stunt.” To enter the Bright World the ghosts must surrender their attachments, opinions, addictions, and pride.

And …

The narrator (C.S. Lewis), one of the ghosts who desires to enter the heavenly kingdom and not return to the city, enjoys a conversation with the Spirit addressed as Teacher, George Macdonald, one of Lewis’s mentors in the art of fantasy literature. The Teacher explains the strange psychology of the Ghosts as the mentality of Milton’s Satan who boasted, “Better to reign in Hell than serve in Heaven.” Macdonald compares these ghosts to a petulant child who “would sooner miss its play and supper than say it was sorry and be friends.” Of course Macdonald is defining the deadly sin of pride in all is many expressions, whether it assumes the form of Achilles’ wrath or Satan’s sense of “injured merit.”

In his essay, Bishop Barron observes that, while Hell seems immense to those entombed there:

However, when the narrator, in dialogue with a heavenly spirit, wonders where precisely Hell is in relation to the heavenly realm, the spirit bends down, pulls a single blade of grass and uses its tip to indicate a tiny, barely perceptible, fissure in the ground. “That’s where you came in,” he explains. All of Hell, which seemed so immense to the narrator, would fit into a practically microscopic space in Heaven. Lewis is illustrating here the Augustinian principle that sin is the state of being incurvatus in se (curved in around oneself). It is the reduction of reality to the infinitely small space of the ego’s concerns and preoccupations. Love, on the contrary, which is the very life of Heaven, is the opening to reality in its fullness; it amounts to a breaking through of the buffered and claustrophobic self; it is the activity of the magna anima (the great soul). We think our own little ego-centric worlds are so impressive, but to those who are truly open to reality, they are less than nothing.

In regard to another chapter, he says:

What I especially appreciate in this episode is Lewis’ spot-on representation of how the soul clings desperately to what is actually killing it, preferring, in W.H. Auden’s phrase, “to be ruined rather than changed.”

In my former life as a journalist covering television, I’ve seen any number of episodes of home and personal makeover shows — from “What Not to Wear” to “Clean House” — in which people desperately want to different lives, but just as desperately don’t want to change anything to achieve them.

I saw it so often that I’ve concluded it’s a fixture of human nature. It’s like wanting to have been a marathon runner while never going further than from the front door to the mailbox.

Here’s a peek at a stage production of “The Great Divorce”:

Image: HarperCollins Edition cover

Visit the Family Theater Productions homepage and Facebook page to learn more about how FTP is reaching out to Hollywood and producing its own projects.

The Hundred-Foot Journey is a Flavorful Treat

posterwebOver the past few years, I’ve become quite the foodie.  So I was delighted to see a new film from producers Steven Spielberg and Oprah Winfrey that stars…well, food!  I was excited to see The Hundred-Foot Journey starring Helen Mirren (The Queen) and wasn’t disappointed.

The Hundred-Foot Journey is a charming film (based on the best-selling novel) about the Kadam family, who was forced from their home of India and make their way to a quiet village in France to open their family restaurant.  But there is one problem…they are opening it next door to a very respected and celebrated French establishment run by Madame Mallory, played by the always fabulous Helen Mirren.  Madame Mallory wants them gone, until she discovers that the young Hassan Kadam has potential to be the next 3-star chef, and she takes him under her wing.

fathersonhelenwebIt’s a wonderful story about love.  Love is found all around…in the bond between father and son, in the blossoming relationship between the son and his neighbor, and of course, in the love of food.

The love of food is what draws all the film’s characters together as a family.  The love of food is what helps them to discover, that although they are all different culturally, they are all part of the same human family.  And it’s the love of food that brings them home to their family.  As Papa Kadam notes when asked by his son where was home, “Home is where your family is.”helenofferingsweetsweb

Audiences will find this film to be a lovely two hour retreat into the French countryside, a film that doesn’t have any unnecessary sex, violence, or bad language…a rarity these days.  But a word of advice before watching this film in the theater: DON’T GO HUNGRY!  This film will make you want to run right out and eat at the best French restaurant in town.

Heaven is for Real Offers Up Faith-based Entertainment for the Whole Family Just in Time for Easter

Do you believe in Heaven? Do you really believe in Heaven? That is the question that is asked in the new film by Sony/Tri-Star Pictures, Heaven is for Real, opening this Easter weekend.  Based on the book of the same name, the story is about the Burpo Family and their son Colton, who had a near death experience when he was just 4 years old.  After his recovery, Colton starts to talk about how he went to heaven, what it was like, and the people he met there.  These statements shake the small rural town the family lives in and the small church family that is ministered to by their Pastor, Colton’s father.  As Christians, they have always said they believed in Heaven.  But now they are forced to decide if they really do believe what they always have said they believed.movie poster

Heaven is for Real stars Greg Kinnear as Pastor Todd Burpo.  Kinnear gives a convincing performance as a man who is confronted with the beliefs that he preaches.  Connor Corum debuts in his first major role as Colton.  For a 4 year old, he does quite well in the role and is adorable and endearing to the audience.  The rest of the cast is rounded out with veteran actors such as Thomas Haden Church, Margo Martindale, and Kelly Reilly.  Audiences will appreciate the portrayal of a loving family who rely on their faith to stick together during the difficult times.  They will also enjoy the loyal friendship seen between Greg Kinnear and Thomas Haden Church.

As Christians it can be easy to “talk the talk” but more difficult to “walk the walk”.  This film will inspire you to look inside and ask yourself if you really do believe what you say you do.  Heaven is for Real is a sweet and gripping story for the whole family that is perfect to enjoy this Easter Season.

Heaven is for Real opens April 16th.