Category: News & Trends

‘Masterpiece’: ‘Les Miserables,’ Jane Austen and Big-Screen ‘Downton Abbey’

Long a TV haven for beautifully produced drama — frequently, but not universally, suitable for middle-schoolers and up — PBS “Masterpiece” has more great literature and family drama in the pipeline.

Just don’t expect any of these to appear soon.

Let’s take a look …

“Les Miserables” (currently in production to air in 2019)

Victor Hugo’s classic novel has already been adapted into a hit musical, which also became a hit movie — both of which maintained the Catholic core of the 1862 story, which culminates the 1832 anti-monarchist June Rebellion in Paris (not the French Revolution, that was from 1789-1799).

The six-part BBC/”Masterpiece” production stars Dominic West (“The Wire”) as Jean Valjean, whose minor misdeed runs him afoul of the authorities — especially the relentless policeman Javert (David Oyelowo). But the kindness of a bishop, which the desperate Valjean repays by stealing from him, sets Valjean on a winding path that ultimately leads to his transformation and redemption.

Also starring are Lily Collins as Fantine, whose child Valjean later adopts.

The writer is Andrew Davies, who has adapted many classic novels for the screen, including the BBC’s acclaimed 1995 version of Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice.”

The BBC has released some pictures. In order: Collins, West and Oyelowo.

Lily Collins as Fantine. Credit: BBC

 

Dominic West as Jean Valjean. Credit: BBC

 

David Oyelowo as Javert. Credit: BBC

“Sanditon” (begins filming in Spring 2019)

Andrew Davies is also adopting Jane Austen’s “Sanditon,” left unfinished at her death at the age of 41. He’s expanding the 11-chapter fragment into eight 60-minute episodes, produced by “Masterpiece” in partnership with ITV, and distributed by BBC Studios.

From PBS:

Written only months before Austen’s death in 1817, Sanditon tells the story of the joyously impulsive, spirited and unconventional Charlotte Heywood and her spiky relationship with the humorous, charming (and slightly wild!) Sidney Parker. When a chance accident transports her from her rural hometown of Willingden to the would-be coastal resort of the eponymous title, it exposes Charlotte to the intrigues and dalliances of a seaside town on the make, and the characters whose fortunes depend on its commercial success. The twists and turns of the plot, which take viewers from the West Indies to the rotting alleys of London, expose the hidden agendas of each character and sees Charlotte discover herself… and ultimately find love.

ITV’s Head of Drama, Polly Hill commented: “It’s a rich, romantic, family saga built upon the foundations Jane Austen laid. There is no one better to adapt her unfinished novel than Andrew who has an incredible track record for bold and original adaptations. We’re delighted to commission Sanditon from Belinda Campbell and her team at Red Planet Pictures.”

And, said Davies on assuming the task of channeling Austen:

Jane Austen managed to write only a fragment of her last novel before she died – but what a fragment! Sanditon tells the story of the transformation of a sleepy fishing village into a fashionable seaside resort, with a spirited young heroine, a couple of entrepreneurial brothers, some dodgy financial dealings, a West Indian heiress, and quite a bit of nude bathing. It’s been a privilege and a thrill for me to develop Sanditon into a TV drama for a modern audience.

“Downton Abbey” (feature-film sequel planned; not in production yet)

All the major stars from “Masterpiece’s” megahit “Downton Abbey” are returning for the planned feature-film version, including Maggie Smith (Violet Crawley, Dowager Countess of Grantham) — just confirmed by People on July 16; Michelle Dockery (Lady Mary Crawley); Laura Carmichael (Lady Edith Crawley); Joanne Froggatt (Anna Bates); Hugh Bonneville (Robert Crawley, Earl of Grantham); and Elizabeth McGovern (Cora Crawley, Countess of Grantham).

Directing is Brian Percival, who directed the series’ pilot; plot details are unknown. The writer is British Catholic Julian Fellowes, who’s also writing a 10-part series for NBC called “The Gilded Age.” Set in 1880s New York City, it follows the conflict as the city’s old-money families have to deal with a sudden influx of social-climbing nouveau riche.

Said Fellowes in the U.K. Guardian:

To write The Gilded Age is the fulfilment of a personal dream.

I have been fascinated by this period of American history for many years, and now NBC has given me the chance to bring it to a modern audience. I could not be more excited and thrilled.

The truth is, America is a wonderful country with a rich and varied history, and nothing could give me more pleasure than to be the person to bring that compelling history to the screen.

We’ll have to wait and see how many of these productions will be suitable for the whole family, but at least we know they’ll be intelligently written — and these days, that’s something.

Image: PBS/BBC

Learn more about Family Theater Productions’ upcoming, new and vintage productions as well as our Hollywood Outreach Programs; and, of course, you’ll find us on Facebook. Visit our YouTube and Ustream Channels for our contemporary and classic productions.

‘Tag’: The Real ‘Tag Bro’ Priest on Family, Friendship and Sacrifice

Tag premiere — Father Sean Raftis (6th from the left)

Father Sean Raftis is an ordinary parish priest in Columbia Falls, Montana, but an extraordinary group of friends he’s maintained since grade school — and their decades-long game of tag — recently inspired a Hollywood movie.

Released on June 15, “Tag” is very loosely based on the real-life story, outlined in a 2013 Wall Street Journal article (which, to this day, is behind the WSJ’s paywall). What stays the same between reality and fiction is men well into midlife who still designate a period of time during each year, as outlined in a Tag Participation Agreement, to see who’s It.

What’s changed is that the 10 Tag Brothers are now five, and the tag time is in May instead of February. Also, while the Tag Brothers did do some wacky things to tag each other (as you can see in clips at the end of the film), the movie takes it to an extreme level, as four pals (Ed Helms, Jon Hamm, Hannibal Buress, Jake Johnson) try to tag the one who’s never been It (Jeremy Renner).

“Tag: is “40 to 50 percent more profane than it needs to be…”

As to the movie, here’s what I said in my Pax Culturati blog at Patheos (which also includes an account of going to the premiere with Father Raftis):

Frankly, the movie is 40 to 50 percent more profane than it needs to be; there’s a miscarriage gag that’s in seriously poor taste (not sure, though, how a miscarriage gag could ever be in anything but poor taste); and the breaking of a (not Catholic) church stained-glass window seemed both unnecessary and a lost opportunity for a laugh and a realization that maybe some things are still sacred. Oh, well.

But, it was funny (and I’m a hard sell on comedy), and the underlying sweetness of a story about male friendship enduring into adulthood somehow survived.

Needless to say, none of the pals in “Tag” is a priest or likely to become one, but Father Raftis was a bit of a hit at the premiere, especially with young viewers who wanted photos with him.

The priest as “every man,” and a nod to Father Peyton …

But, he hasn’t gotten a big head.

“I like the idea of the priest being every man,” he says. “I grew up on the north side of Spokane, as a regular kid, an ordinary kid, wasn’t that great in athletics. I had health issues, but I was still able to make great friends through grade school.”

Father Raftis also gives credit to the love and self-sacrifice of his parents, who sent him to Catholic school and to Gonzaga University (named after Jesuit St. Aloysius Gonzaga, whose feast day is today, June 21).

He even tosses in a reference to Family Theater Productions’ founder, Father Patrick Peyton, C.S.C., noting that his siblings also serve others: his brother, as a police officer, and his sister, as a caregiver.

“Therein lies the domestic church of Father Peyton,” he says. “The family that prays together, stays together.

“Having that domestic church and living that out made all the difference in my life, and I’m so grateful to God for everything. I wrote to [my friend, screenwriter Karen Hall], before I went to the premiere, and I said, ‘Any counseling you can give?’ Her counsel was exactly right. She said, ‘Soak it in and give all the glory to God, from whom all good things come.’

“That was an opportunity to try, as an ordinary guy. It’s kind of funny, because the monks saved Western civilization by preserving the great works of philosophy and Scripture. Here I am — I played a game of tag.

“Christ blesses that ordinary aspect, and that’s something that’s necessary for us priests. It was a great privilege and a blessing and a humbling lesson to be there as a priest. I’m not Cardinal Avery Dulles; I’m not Father Richard John Neuhaus; and I’m certainly not Karol Wojtyla, but being a Tag Brother, or a Tag Priest, is pretty cool.

“I’m trying to reach out to people who might not otherwise have had contact with a priest, because a lot of people don’t.”

Finding God in everything …

I watched Father Raftis take pictures with the young people, greet the actors, greet a couple of young police officers outside the premiere, shake hands with any number of folks who probably never see a priest except on TV.

The movie wasn’t especially holy, and certainly not for the whole family, but it did introduce a lot of people to Father Raftis and his friends.

“We’re to find God in everything,” he says, “especially in the small things. It’s like that tiny, whispering sound. I didn’t find God in the earthquake; I didn’t find God in the great noises; it was in that tiny, whispering sound.

“That’s something we need to reconnect with, and part of that is our association with our friends in Christ, our friends at the work place, where we’re called to witness to Christ.”

But don’t fear, Father Raftis has not gone Hollywood.

“I’m not a star, and that and two bucks will get you a cup of coffee. Fame is fleeting; time is fleeting. What matters is how we follow Christ. That’s the one thing I have to be very cautious about and very cognizant of, is my calling to be a priest. I’m not called to be a Hollywood star.

“That comes with its own set of talents, and its own set of disciplines. I have enough of a challenge being a priest and trying to be a good one.”

After his Hollywood adventure, Father Raftis returned to St. Richard Church in Columbia Falls.

“I had Mass on Sunday [after the premiere]. I did the Extraordinary Form only, and I did a homily, and I did an apologia [about the movie], saying, ‘Look, it’s R-rated.’ One of the guys came up — he’s a highly decorated retired Marine — and he said, ‘Father, look, the movie is going to do what it does. We know who you are. There are going to be good things happening because of this.’

“That’s my only hope, that something good happens for God out of it. … People yearn, they starve for brotherly or sisterly affection. When we yearn for friendship, we yearn for the Divine.”

Does the game go on?

“Yeah,” he says, “it goes on indefinitely, until one of us is standing.”

Images: Courtesy Kate O’Hare, Warner Bros., Father Sean Raftis

Learn more about Family Theater Productions’ upcoming, new and vintage productions as well as our Hollywood Outreach Programs; and, of course, you’ll find us on Facebook.

Visit our YouTube and Ustream Channels for our contemporary and classic productions.

‘The Dating Project’ on Digital and DVD: Can a Documentary Help You Find Love?

Dr. Kerry Cronin, “The Dating Project”

Think of all the great marriages you know. Each started with a moment of meeting. Maybe it went well; maybe it went badly. But there can be no potential of a happy ending without a beginning. That’s the message of the new documentary “The Dating Project,” which had a theatrical preview in April and is out now in digital HD and on DV

The feature-length film profiles five singles — between college-age and 40s — trying to find love in a culture where the entire social script of dating and mating has been deconstructed.

If you wonder why 50 percent of America is single, and why so many young people aren’t getting married, it may be because many don’t even know where to start, in terms of building a healthy relationship from the ground up.

“The Dating Project” is both heartbreaking and heartwarming, funny and forlorn. It doesn’t sugarcoat the difficulty of finding love in modern America, but it does offer some practical suggestions.

At the core of “The Dating Project” is the work of Boston College philosophy professor Dr. Kerry Cronin. About 12 years ago, responding to something she noticed about her students’ difficulty with forming relationships, she decided to challenge them to ask someone out on a date — no alcohol, no physical contact other than a hug, during the day, no more than 90 mins in length, etc.

To her amazement, this apparently simple task hit many of her students as an entirely novel idea, as opposed to just “hanging out” or “hooking up” with someone, which can mean anything from a drunken make-out session to sex.

Here’s Cronin’s assignment to her students (also available at the Website for the film, DatingProjectMovie.com):

Over the years, Cronin has seen the hookup culture only expand on campus, and the social script for dating steadily erode — not only in college, but in the adult working world as well. At the same time, the entertainment industry isn’t helping people form a realistic notion of romance.

“My students are convinced,” she says, “by some sort of formula of romantic comedies, maybe, that you’re going to hate somebody until you love that person, suddenly. The formula of seeing somebody across a room, or the bookstore, and then 10 years later you find that person.

“I like the idea of a soulmate, but guess what? We’re all souls, and we’re all searching for love and relationships and connection. The fact of the matter is, there are a lot of great possibilities out there. Attraction can grow; crushes can grow; feelings can change.

“But we’re mesmerized by the, ‘Oh, it was an instantaneous thing, and that’s it, the chemistry.’ A lot of college students especially will say to me, “I just figured, sometime in my 20s, it will just happen’ — as though, there’s nothing I have to do myself.

“It’s a version of, ‘God will drop someone in my lap, whom God picked for me from time immemorial.'”

Among many Christians, there’s the idea that dating is solely a precursor to marriage, and that you should not go on dates with anyone unless that person is a likely marriage prospect. Cronin disagrees with this all-or-nothing approach (with the understanding that, despite lax modern mores, dating someone isn’t necessarily synonymous with having sex).

“I like to advocate for low-stakes dating,” she says. “We learn a lot about ourselves in dating, and it’s not just simply utilitarian in that way. We learn about other people in the world, and God, in dating people outside our usual type.

“We learn how to put another person first, put another person’s cares and concerns maybe before our own. We learn how to navigate emotional landscapes that are different from the landscapes we’re dealing with in friendships and family relationships.

“You learn how to open your heart, and you learn about some things that you shouldn’t open your heart to, and things that don’t work with you and your values.”

While a first date that reveals seriously unpleasant or dangerous things about the other person should send you in the opposite direction, Cronin urges that a merely shaky first round might deserve a do-over.

She says, “There’s a lot that goes on in a first date about nerves, and we’re all awkward. We’re trying to make our way through the first-date conversation. It’s almost always worthwhile to go on a second and even a third date, just to really see if you can uncover in yourself, and another person, what’s really up with that person.”

Chris Meehan, “The Dating Project”

Asked what she’s like single people to take away from “The Dating Project,” Cronin says, “Just try. Just try. A lot of people are paralyzed by their fears and their past, and what went wrong in the past and could go wrong in the future. Sometimes you just have to try.”

If it doesn’t work out?

“You can try again,” Cronin says. “When you try, people around you find out that you’re trying, and so then they might be willing to ask you out. Dating begets dating. If you try, then other people might try with you.”

Not specifically a Christian film, “The Dating Project” counts many faithful Catholics among the filmmakers, and it’s suffused with Catholic values. There is a brief (but not explicit) discussion among friends about pornography. With that proviso in mind, it’s suitable for mature middle-schoolers and up, for youth groups, young-adult ministries, and anyone who’s free and willing to date or knows someone who is.

“The Dating Project” — from Paulist Productions, MPower Pictures and Family Theater Productions, and distributed by PureFlix — is currently available on DVD (including in Target and Walmart), and for digital rental or purchase from several platforms, including Amazon Video, iTunes, Vudu and Google Play. Click here to learn more.

There’s even a discussion guide created by Focus on the Family’s Boundless young-adult ministry — click here to sign up.

Image: Courtesy PureFlix/Paulist Productions/MPower/Family Theater Productions

Learn more about Family Theater Productions’ upcoming, new and vintage productions as well as our Hollywood Outreach Programs; and, of course, you’ll find us on Facebook.

Visit our YouTube and Ustream Channels for our contemporary and classic productions.

‘Paul, Apostle of Christ’: Herald of the Better Christian/Catholic Film

The new movie about St. Paul from ODB Films, the filmmakers who brought you Full of Grace, comes to theaters on March 23, just in time for Palm Sunday on the 25th. Let me answer the big questions right away:

Is it good? Yes.

Is it biblical? Sort of.

It’s historical and extra-biblical, meaning it takes historical events and passages from the Bible that we know occurred. Then, the movie depicts them, along with scenes and events created by the filmmakers that are not in Sacred Scripture but could have happened.

Is it heretical? No.

Not to my understanding, and not to any of the priests and theologians whom I have asked about the movie. Now, if you are one of those people who feels that depicting anything from the Bible that is not explicitly in the Bible, you will have problems with the film. But, to paraphrase St. John the Apostle, if everything that Christ did was written down, there would not be enough books in the world to record it.

How is the message and the portrayal of faith? The message is powerful, and faith is portrayed as meaningful and positive, but also real.

Which means some people doubt, some struggle, some even fall away. Even Paul questions. But – spoiler alert – the ending message of faith, hope and love is all the more powerful for it. For those who are offended by saints depicted as actual human beings, be warned. However, Paul in the New Testament writes about the good he wants to do but does not do, and the bad he does not want to do but does anyway.

Should I see it?  YES.

It is a striking, contemplative look at one of the most influential people in all of Christianity.

Paul, Apostle of Christ, however, is significant for another reason as well: I believe it embodies the next step of faith–based films, and this is a good thing!

I say this because, while still being low-budget (especially by Hollywood standards), it is a professional-looking movie, with real, recognizable actors: Jim Caviezel (Passion of the Christ, Person of Interest), James Faulkner (Downton Abbey, Game of Thrones) and Olivier Martinez (Revenge & S.W.A.T.). It also delivers a powerful story with quality writing, AND it still manages to deliver a message rather than just showing a sermon on screen.

Have you ever felt in the past that saying you liked Christian films was like confessing to a guilty pleasure? When someone, especially a non-believer, asked if you liked certain famous, faith-based movies, did you feel like you needed to justify yourself if you said “yes”?

For example, you would admit the acting isn’t great, the writing is heavy-handed, and the production value was just above amateur – but hey, the message was fantastic! Well, I think that day is disappearing, where audiences are no longer turning out like they used to just because a film mentions Jesus and stars Kirk Cameron or Kevin Sorbo. (God bless you, Kirk and Kevin, for being trailblazers in this field!)

Critics and fans have been asking, when will faith-based films be … well, good. In all honesty, there have been such high-budgeted fair which often featured a known star or two. These are films like Risen and Miracles from Heaven, and they did deliver a higher-quality experience However, the budgets were much, much bigger, therefore much riskier and that gave rise to the question– if a film like Moonlight could be made for $2 million and be Academy Award-worthy (it won the best picture Oscar in 2017), why couldn’t faith films be the same?

And, where were the Catholics in all this Christian content?

Well, we find our answer in Paul, Apostle of Christ. Made for a slightly larger budget than God’s Not Dead 2 and War Room ($3 million apiece, per BoxOfficeMojo.com) and for a bit less than recent release I Can Only Imagine, here is a modestly priced movie, made by Catholics, that still delivers in quality on every level.

Now, to be clear, this film is more of a chamber piece, literally, where Paul spends most of the story in a chamber, his prison cell. However, a chamber piece usually means a film that largely shows people talking in rooms. There are no car (or chariot) chases or harrowing escapes, and this film does not focus on some of the more action-packed moments of St. Paul’s life.

Instead, it shows Paul as an old man, who is a prisoner of Nero and awaits the eventual day of his execution. It opens with the Gospel writer, St. Luke, arriving in Rome to find the Christian community there. He wants to connect with Paul to guide him in helping the faithful, who are now facing intense persecution under the emperor.

Despite the lack of big action scenes, the film still manages to touch the heart by asking, arguing and addressing some of the big issues that Christian faced back then and still struggle with today. For example, what it does it mean to believe when the powers of the world seem stacked against you? Also, how do you find hope and love in a world so ruled by fear and hate? More importantly, if you can find these graces, how do you live them?

Paul, Apostle of Christ brings that drama to the big screen in a subtle but beautiful and effective way.

I would recommend going to the theaters to have this film help you start your Holy Week.

Image: ODB Films/Sony Affirm

Learn more about Family Theater Productions’ upcoming, new and vintage productions as well as our Hollywood Outreach Programs; and, of course, you’ll find us on Facebook.

Visit our YouTube and Ustream Channels for our contemporary and classic productions.

‘Paul, Apostle of Christ’ Star Jim Caviezel Talks Christian Persecution

Yesterday (March 20), at the Dallas premiere of “Paul, Apostle of Christ,” The Hill reporter Rick Manning caught up with Jim Caviezel, who plays the Apostle Luke in the new movie, hitting theaters on Friday, March 23.

Faith marketer Matthew Faraci shot this Facebook Live video of Manning asking Caviezel about the persecution of Chrtistians, and got this stunning answer. Click here for the original Facebook video (which is going viral), and below — with permission from both Manning and Faraci — is what happened:

Click here for more information on “Paul, Apostle of Christ” — which is excellent, BTW — and buy tickets.

Image: ODB Films/Sony Affirm

Learn more about Family Theater Productions’ upcoming, new and vintage productions as well as our Hollywood Outreach Programs; and, of course, you’ll find us on Facebook.

Visit our YouTube and Ustream Channels for our contemporary and classic productions.

Faith on Ice: Catholics and the Winter Olympics

Sports can provide a great platform to talk about faith. We saw shout-outs to Christ from Philadelphia Eagles Coach Doug Pederson, QB Nick Foles and tight end Zach Ertz after their Feb. 4 Super Bowl victory. Now, the Church is getting a boost from the 2018 Winter Olympics, currently taking place in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

Here are a few of the Catholic athletes who’ve made a mark on Olympic ice, now and in the past:

Hannah and Marissa Brandt:

These Minnesota sisters are graduates of Catholic institutions St. Odilia School in Shoreview and Hill-Murray High School in Maplewood, and are hockey standouts for two different teams. Hannah is a foreward for the U.S. women’s Olympic team; and Marissa — who was adopted from South Korea as a baby — plays for the combined Korean women’s hockey team, under her birth name, Park-Yoon Jung.

Yuna Kim:

The 27-year-old South Korean gold medal-winning figure skater, now retired, was the final torch-bearer and lit the official Olympic torch at the Pyeongchang Opening Ceremony on Feb. 9.

From Catholic News Agency:

After making the sign of the cross as she stepped onto the ice to win gold in the 2010 Vancouver Games with a record-breaking score, Kim teamed up with Korean bishops for a national rosary campaign. Kim was seen wearing a rosary ring, which her fans had previously mistaken for an engagement ring, during her silver-medal performance at the 2014 Sochi Games.

The Olympian converted to the Catholic faith alongside her mother in 2008 after they came in contact with local nuns and Catholic organizations through her personal physician – also a Catholic – who was treating her for knee injuries.

At her baptism, Kim took the name “Stella” after Mary, Star of the Sea, and told a diocesan paper that during the baptismal rite she “felt an enormous consolation in my heart” and promised God to continue to “pray always,” especially before competitions.

Kim has also been active in using her position as an opportunity for charitable works, volunteering and donating funds to Catholic Hospitals, universities, and other charitable organizations, and working alongside the Catholic bishops in Korea as a spokeswoman for Catholic charities in Seoul.

Kirstin Holum (a k a Sister Catherine of the Franciscan Sisters of the Renewal):

Kim isn’t the only Olympic athlete to let her Catholic faith lead the way after the Games. At the age of 17, Kirstin Holum competed for the U.S. in speedskating in Nagano, Japan, in 1998. Her mother, Dianne, was an Olympic gold-medalist in 1972 and coached American Eric Heiden to five gold medals at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, N.Y.

But Holum never returned to the Olympic ice. She did a stint in art school in Chicago, then gave her life over to the Lord. She’s currently based at St. Clare’s Convent in the U.K. city of Leeds.

From USA Today:

At first she rarely spoke about her former life as a speedskater and many of the sisters in her convent did not know she had once been to the Olympics. However, after publication of a feature article during the 2010 Vancouver Games, her story became widely known in the Catholic community and she continues to receive regular invitations to speak publicly, including a speech in front of 10,000 people at a religious meeting in London.

“What has opened up especially in the last eight years is the chance to look back at so many of the beautiful things about skating and the Olympics,” Holum told USA TODAY Sports in a phone conversation while she was on a brief trip to the U.S. “I don’t have a normal story of coming into the convent. It is quite unique. To have the opportunity to look back and have thanks, and to share that with people I come into contact with, is a blessing.”

Without TV in the convent, Sister Catherine may not be able to watch the Pyeongchang Games, but you know she is praying for all to do their best and give glory to God.

Curt Tomasevicz:

As a bobsledder, Tomasevicz won Olympic gold and bronze, but the now-retired 37-year-old weighed from his native Nebraska how his faith kept him on an even keel after his athletic career.

He told the National Catholic Register:

If I weren’t Catholic, I think my life would be the equivalent of a bobsled crash. Being Catholic allows me to get my priorities straight and know that, despite what most people will tell you, athletic competitions are fleeting and you should not measure your self-worth through them. There’s lots of pressure to do well, and pressure to do well badly, so to speak — meaning that winning is held up as the only thing and that a little cheating is understandable.

Competition is fun, but only in the context of following the rules. Taking given parameters and making the most of them can be a multifaceted, engaging adventure. That’s at the heart of one of the classes I teach to undergrads now. It’s an intro to engineering course involving sports — the tools we use in competition (bobsleds, rackets, bats, gloves and so on) and the biomechanics of competition (which postures, strides, timings and angles result in best runs, passes, pitches and so on).

He’s still single, but said:

I do want to be a husband and father, but that took a back seat to bobsledding for a decade. I’m still involved somewhat in the sport, but nothing like I used to be, which means that marriage is far more likely. Yet marriage is a marathon rather than a sprint, so I’m not rushing into it. The Diocese of Lincoln is one of the best in the nation, but even if I don’t find a wife here, there is one out there, if marriage is indeed what God wants for me.

Vatican City even sent a delegation to the Games, attending the Opening Ceremonies and observing a meeting of the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

From the U.K. Catholic Herald:

The Vatican newspaper L’Osservatore Romano reported Friday that Monsignor Melchor Sanchez De Toca Y Alameda of the Pontifical Council for Culture will lead the delegation to the session, a series of meetings where Olympic policies are decided.

In the spirit of friendship, Sanchez will present International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach and Korean athletes with jerseys from the Vatican Athletics squad, which is made up of Vatican employees.

Even “without the possibility of direct participation in the Olympics by Vatican athletes,” L’Osservatore adds that relations with the IOC are ongoing and will continue with the Summer Youth Olympics in October in Buenos Aires — Pope Francis’s hometown.

Work hard, train hard … pray hard!

Image: Wikimedia Commons

Learn more about Family Theater Productions’ upcoming, new and vintage productions as well as our Hollywood Outreach Programs; and, of course, you’ll find us on Facebook.

Visit our YouTube and Ustream Channels for our contemporary and classic productions.