Should You Give Up Social Media in 2019? Bishop Barron Weighs In

Resolved for 2019: Giving up all social media. Done. Kaput. Gone! … But is that a good idea?

If you work in media, like we do at Family Theater Productions, that’s not even a question. You just can’t. For hearing from the audience, and communicating back to them, social media is vital. Otherwise, it’s just a one-way ad stream going outward, with no feedback — and that’s not good.

We’re active on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, both for FTP and for our productions — like The Dating Project and Catholic Central — and every day, we check to see what you’re thinking and saying (and we hope you check in with us).

But for me especially, as Social Media Manager, in the thick of it every day …whoa, there’s a lot of bad out there. I spent many years in mainstream entertainment journalism before I came here, so the craziness and negativity doesn’t surprise me. Every now and then, though, I’m even brought up short by just how nasty people can be.

On the other hand, we get lots of positive, wonderful and helpful feedback as well. Like this comment on YouTube:

And, outside of business, think of all the ways social media has connected people — lost relatives, old and new friends, people in crisis, potential pets and spouses. It’s also brought us shocking, important or heartwarming stories from the furthest corners of the world.

Personally, I think of Facebook as a huge dinner party, with invited friends, nosy neighbors, party crashers and crazy uncles (and aunts).  Twitter is the 24/7/365 rowdy cocktail chatter of the world, encircled by an eternally updating news ticker. Instagram is the beauty (and weirdness) of the world as it is, with a heavy dose of the world as we pretend it is.

Professionally, I’m eternally surprised to learn what you all out there like, and don’t like. Trust me, we listen, and we learn. Anyone who works in media has to have an ear to all the social channels. We can work on projects for years, talk among ourselves about what we like and don’t like, what we think will work — but ultimately, you guys are the ones that decide whether a project is a success.

Media ignores the voice of the audience at its peril. Creators can’t allow the audience to dictate to them — after all, it’s that creator’s unique voice that can make something special and authentic — but at the same time, if they want their creations to be enjoyed and appreciated (and most especially, produced), they need to pay attention. Sometimes it can be bruising, but it’s essential.

But even secular media, including such business-focused sites as Ragan.com, realizes that one has to take a break every now and then. From a post today:

If you have an unhealthy relationship with social media, consider a cleansing “fast.” Give up Snapchat or Facebook for Lent. Break it off with whichever platforms give you grief and little else.

For people of faith, using social media can be especially fraught. For that, I happily yield the floor to Los Angeles’ Bishop Robert Barron, who knows as much as anyone about the rewards and pitfalls of faith in the social square:

Here’s to a happy, healthy and sane 2019, even in social media!

Image: Shutterstock

Kate O’Hare, a longtime entertainment journalist, is Social Media Manager at Family Theater Productions.

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